“This edition of The State of Food Insecurity in the World focuses on food price volatility and high food prices, which are likely to continue in the years ahead. Indeed, the Group of Twenty (G20) Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors has become actively engaged in finding cost-effective ways to reduce price volatility and mitigate its effects when it does occur. By using previously unavailable data sources and studies, this report goes beyond the global-scale analyses to find out what happened on the domestic markets where poor people buy and sell their food in order to draw policy relevant lessons from the world food crisis of 2006–08.

The report emphasizes that the impact of world price changes on household food security and nutrition is highly context-specific. The impact depends on the commodity, the national policies that affect price transmission from world markets to domestic markets, the demographic and production characteristics of different households and a range of other factors. This diversity of impacts, both within and between countries, points to a need for improved data and analysis so that governments can implement more effective policies. Better and more predictable policies can not only reduce unwanted side-effects on other countries, but can simultaneously reduce food insecurity and domestic price volatility at home.”

To view The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2011 Report Click Here .

For more information regarding the publication as well as the Food and Agricluture Orgainzation of the United Nations please visit http://www.fao.org/

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